The Passion and Poetry of Community Leadership

Last week I was invited talk about Community Leadership at Darlene Clover’s University of Victoria class. At the end of the class, Darlene offered up a ‘found poem’ that poignantly captured the essence of my presentation. I felt so honoured, and it resonated so deeply, that I thought it was worth sharing…

Ode to Mandy Leith

by Darlene Clover

Do your part
Believe in something
Arab spring, European summer, North American fall
Our stories are powerful
Stories make us human
Raise your message above the rest
Be the change you want to see
Live your message through your life
Move forward with what inspires you
Speak to where the community is at
Plant your dreams
Challenge the didactic passive education role
Encourage conversation
Ask what people think
Create a sense of community
Change the seating, put the audience at the centre
Have food – they will come
Everyone is a community leader
Occupy everything
Use living microphones
Be loud, commit, build trust, democratize
Own your culture, be a media activist
Teach media literacy
Tear down the power structures and senseless bureaucracies
Let film speak for your community
Restore the banter of the bazaar
Breed engagement, create traffic
Follow the rules/break the rules
Let passion exist

Currently, my passion is leading me to work with the vibrant global Occupy movement. Where does your passion live?

Documentary, Reality and the Future

For a couple of years now, we’ve been grappling with the very real possibility of the demise of the Canadian documentary. The industry as we’ve known it over the last 20 years has been dealt a number of life-threatening blows, a lethal concoction made up of  equal parts economic turn-down, cancelled broadcast strands, government funding cuts, the emergence of low cost Reality TV, digital technology and the Internet. The number of Canadian docs being made has been steadily dropping over the last 5 years, by as much as 21% according to Getting Real 4, the Documentary Organization of Canada‘s most recent economic profile of the Canadian documentary production industry. Ironically, for audiences, the documentary has never been so popular. Download the detailed report here: Getting Real.

Getting Real About Documentary

This trend isn’t exactly news. Many doc filmmakers are struggling as the market shrinks and turning to crowdfunding sites such as IndieGogo and Kickstarter with varying success. Over the last couple years, I’ve responded by successfully rebranding as a media-savvy storyteller, educator and social media content strategist. But my heart isn’t able to let go so easily; I’m still set on finding a way forward for the beloved genre.  As part of my involvement with the Documentary Organization of Canada’s National Board of Directors, I’ve helped spawn an audience development campaign to raise awareness about the plight of this endangered storytelling species.

We Love Documentary logo

www.WeLoveDocumentary.com

We Love Documentary launched at HotDocs 2011 and will form part of a longterm campaign in conjunction with DOC’s advocacy efforts. Plus I’m currently developing a fun interactive cross-country roadtrip project that will engage documentary audiences, filmmakers and changemakers across the country: get ready to Get on the DOC Bus!

So while I haven’t exactly been hiding out from the changing media landscape, my experience at last week’s VIFF Film Forum was a rude shock to the documentary ego.

The Beginning of the End Game

The first indication that we’re in an end-game scenario came when Storyville Vancouver was cancelled. We can only speculate why no international broadcast commissioners came to hear BC doc filmmakers make public pitches this year.

The next clue came when I checked out the VIFF Film Forum program: for the first time this year, ‘Documentary Day’ was renamed ‘Factual Day’. What used to be a day of talks dedicated to the genre, this year, was a disorienting mashup of what I might call FactuReality.

Cartoon about Reality TV: chickens watching a chicken roasting on a spit.

Reality TV: It's all about the sizzle

Sessions included documentary’s Pursuit of Objectivity (which the excellent panel agreed was not the point of documentary at all); producing a punchy sizzle reel to upsell your Reality series; CBC’s new online interactive experiences; and the transmedia project Collapsus experiments in cross-platform storytelling. All interesting and tangentially relevant, but I missed the usual networking with my fellow doc filmmaking colleagues, who were, for the most part, noticeably absent.

Good Luck With That

The real sting was delivered during the tail end of the day, at the Industry Networking Cocktail reception. After Minister Ida Chong officially opened the Forum, I found myself in conversation with Don Fast, Deputy Minister of BC Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development. “What do you do?”, he asked me. I began by cheerfully replying “Well, I was a documentary filmmaker, when there was an industry…” But before I was able to tell him about my creative re-branding and ask his thoughts on the future, he changed the subject. I heard all about his daughter, the actress. At the end of our conversation, he shook my hand with a friendly smile, saying “Good luck with making  documentaries.”

I’m usually pretty optimistic, but I have to admit I left feeling rather discouraged. What do you think, dear reader? What does the future of documentary look like from where you sit?